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Universal Access to Healthcare: Tackling the Unique Callenges of Canadians with Disabilities as Seniors Population Rises

Healthy living

Fall Prevention resources
This list of fall prevention resources was compiled by Dr. Eoghan O’Shea as part of his collaboration with Demand a Plan for Fall Prevention Month
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Prevent Falls This Fall 2018
Many things can contribute to a person’s risk of falling. But what are some of the steps we can take to reduce those risks?
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Fall Prevention in images
Take a look at this infographic to learn common causes of falls, and some easy things you can do to reduce your risk!
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CMA Healthy Canadians Grants Spotlight: Global Walkers

Imagine walking around the world without ever leaving your hometown.
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CMA Healthy Canadians Grant Spotlight: Therapy Dog Program

For many people, animals are an important part of their lives. For seniors, especially those who are socially isolated or living in nursing homes, hospitals or retirement residences, animals can provide comfort and companionship, reduce stress and promote a sense of joy and well-being.
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Female Seniors Making the Most of Golden Years

More and more women are facing the realities of aging alone, but this doesn’t have to be a negative thing.
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CMA Health Summit: Watch the sessions live

A livestream will be available on the Health Summit website starting at 7 am CDT (local Winnipeg time) on Monday, August 20 so you can watch the sessions in real time!
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“Retirement” Isn’t What It Used to Be: Many Seniors Want to, Do Keep Working

As life expectancies are much longer now and when people retire they often have several decades of life ahead of them.
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Combating Loneliness and Isolation in Seniors with Community Engagement

Your life shouldn’t stop when you become a senior, or when you retire; you should be able to remain actively and meaningfully engaged with the world.
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Aging with a Disability: Flipping the Script of the Healthy Aging Paradigm

Many Canadians age into disability, meaning that they will acquire conditions and limitations as they grow old. But what of seniors who age with a disability?
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2018 AgeWell Celebrations

On Friday, June 8, the CMA took part in the 7th annual Age Well Solutions conference in Ottawa, along with 31 exhibitors.
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Dr. Chris Simpson on “Canada’s Wait Time Problem”

Former CMA president Dr. Chris Simpson publishes article on the wait time problem in Canadian health care; stresses the effect on seniors.
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How Sercovie helps seniors “Move, Taste, Discover”

One of Quebec’s most successful and unique seniors’ community services organizations started life in 1973 as a neighbourhood initiative launched by a small group of academics and locals concerned with the quality of life of seniors in their area.
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End-of-Life Care is Everyone’s Business: How Compassionate Communities Help Bridge the Support Gap

In 2010, Ian, my partner, learned he had terminal cancer. In 2014 he was in the final weeks of his cancer journey – and I became his sole caregiver. 
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For Canada’s seniors, influenza can pose a serious health threat

For many Canadians, a bout of the flu is an inconvenience; perhaps even representing some downtime to be pampered by a partner and binge on Netflix for a day or two. But for Canada’s 5.9 million seniors, influenza can pose a serious health threat. It can even be deadly.
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Call it a silent killer in a land of plenty

Poor nutrition is putting the lives of many Canadian seniors at risk, according to a new research report. Analysis of results from the 2008–2009 Canadian Community Health Survey – Healthy Aging indicates that close to 1 million Canadian seniors are at nutritional risk. Seniors at nutritional risk who participated in the survey were 60% more likely to die during the survey’s follow-up period and 20% more likely to be admitted to hospital than seniors not at risk.
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Meaningful Social Connections

With social networks flourishing in the digital realm, it’s easier than ever to remain connected with family members, friends and strangers who share an interest. For Canada’s seniors, though, isolation and loneliness remain challenging issues. One program in downtown Toronto — operated by two of the city’s oldest community organizations — is working to provide relief.
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Sedentary living puts many older Canadians at risk

For all seniors, physical activity is an important part of a fall-prevention strategy. Exercise programs that promote balance training combined with strength and flexibility have been shown to be effective in significantly reducing falls and the injuries resulting from falls.
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Improved functioning is particularly crucial when it comes to Canada’s growing number of seniors

Improved functioning is particularly crucial when it comes to Canada’s growing number of seniors, and Pamela Siekierski couldn’t agree more.
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Memory Fitness® helps seniors rejuvenate their brain

As more Canadians are living longer, the Memory Fitness® program was created with the goal of helping older adults rejuvenate their brain and slow the memory loss or cognitive decline associated with aging, using a recreational and fun approach.
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Prescribing physical activity can go a long way in preventing chronic disease

When caring for older patients, Thornton says physicians should not only be talking about medication, but also about what can be done as an adjunct to therapy or in some cases to replace medication altogether.
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First National Initiative To Help Shift Negative Stereotypes

As the only growing age group nationwide, seniors represent the future of our country for foreseeable decades. What role should our health care system play in helping Canadians invest in this future?
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B.C. fitness program proves exercise is crucial, especially as you age

On Gabriola Island, about five kilometres east of Nanaimo, senior citizens are discovering the power of exercise.
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The pan-Canadian chatter

“My friends say I don’t look a day over 66,” jokes Ray of Squamish, British Columbia. At 67 years old, he is seven years in to his retirement–the very retirement he envisioned.
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